Reading People

Anne Bogel’s book on personalities is an excellent book to read at the beginning of the year. It motivated me to be a better version of myself, and should also give you some insight into your own brain to make unlocking that better version easier. Understanding your personality type means a lot more than figuring out which Harry Potter character you are. It means understanding why you act and react the way you do. Once you see what’s happening, you’ll be better equipped to modify behavior you don’t like and also become more understanding of yourself and the people around you. If you have New Year’s resolutions you’re hoping to stick to, this book might help you figure out what is most likely to work for you.

I found this book interesting, though not life-changing. Part of that is, I think I know myself pretty well. I understand my strengths and weaknesses, and I think I’ve accounted for them reasonably well. If you don’t understand yourself, this book might help point you in the right direction. Even if you don’t like what you learn, remember, it’s not your fault that you’re wired the way you are. and there are no “bad” personality types, though society does tend to value some over others.

What this book really did for me was make me more understanding of others. In particular, I don’t see eye to eye with some of my fellow Governing Board members at my church. While reading through the different cognitive functions in chapter 7, some of them jumped out at me. “Ah! That’s Steve!” (His name’s not really Steve.) And even though I still don’t agree with him, I now understand that he is thinking the way he is wired. It’s not his fault, and it’s not a bad thing. It’s just not how I work.

Bogel makes the argument, and I agree with her, that a diverse group is a strong group. So wherever you work with people, on the job, in the community, at home, we all bring different perspectives to the table, and we’ll work better together once we understand and appreciate how those different perspectives work.

She did sort of lose me in the last two chapters. I think that’s largely because the frameworks she covers throughout the book gradually became more complex and less familiar to me. This is only intended to be a brief overview of the frameworks that she has found most useful. She includes suggestions for further reading if you want to really did into any of them.

I’d give this book four out of five stars. I found it pretty useful. You probably will to, and even if you don’t, it will still be well written and interesting.

P.S. Anne Bogel runs a blog, Modern Mrs. Darcy, which covers all sorts of topics, including book recommendations. It’s worth checking out.

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