Lumberjanes Vol. 1

I’m in the middle of a fairly intense online class, which means my recreational reading has been cut to the bone. It seemed like a good time to revisit graphic novels. I got out Noelle Stevenson’s Lumberjanes Vol. 1 because I loved Nimona so much.

Lumberjanes are no Nimona, but I still really liked the book. I felt like I was jumping into the middle of the story, and I’d appreciate a little back story about what this camp is, what brought our cast of characters there and so on, but I’m still hoping some of that comes up in later volumes. I thought the characters had a good mix of different but complementary personalities and styles. I liked the story and the pacing and one of my favorite lines ever now has to be “I AM GOING TO CATCH A FISH BY WRESTLING IT AWAY FROM A BEAR!”

Like the pilot episode of a tv show, this volume whetted my appetite for more of the story, which should be the main purpose of any first installment, whatever medium we’re talking about. Even though it doesn’t rate Nimona’s five stars, I could gush about it for a while and really want to give it four stars.

BUT

Those field manual inserts at the beginning of each chapter were awful. They were boring and full of typos and by the third one I was skipping them. The fact that I could skip them means there was no reason to include them at all. If you want to do something like this, do it well. Throw in some jokes or some foreshadowing or at the very least proofread them.

I almost want to pretend the inserts weren’t there and give this book four stars, but they were there, and they drag the rating down to three stars. Most definitely worth reading but also most definitely room for improvement.

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Mennonite in a Little Black Dress

I grabbed this book based purely on the title. Rhoda Janzen writes about revisiting her Mennonite roots after her marriage ends and a car accident leaves her seriously injured.

Janzen’s writing is funny and sweet and insightful, but it also seemed kind of disconnected to me. I know a memoir isn’t necessarily a linear story, but I still kept expecting things to transition into each other and instead felt like we were hopping from moment to moment with no real connectivity there.

I will applaud Janzen for facing a very difficult time in her life with humor and courage. And for furthermore having the courage and honesty to turn this slump into a well-written book. But I don’t actually know Rhoda Janzen at all and sometimes found myself wondering why I was reading all about her failed marriage and her family quirks. Some of it felt like I was reading things that are really none of my business.

Mennonite in a Little Black Dress is an excellent book, but I don’t think it was a great book for me. If I was grading this based on objective execution, I’d give it four stars. (An argument could even be made for five, but I like to save that for books that really, really earned it.) For my own reading enjoyment, it gets three. I know that’s not a stellar recommendation, but I do still recommend it. You might not love it, but I’m pretty sure you’ll enjoy it.