Hyperbole and a Half

If we’re judging books by their covers, Hyperbole and a Half is a very satisfying book. It’s got a great heft to it, and it has thick, glossy pages that are color coded for each chapter, or comic, or whatever you want to call each section. For content though, it falls disappointingly short.

The first section is hilarious. It had my sister in tears, which doesn’t happen very often. Brosh makes a fine, strong start to her collection of comics. But she doesn’t live up to that initial promise. There are good bits here and there, but overall it is disappointing, and made more disappointing, in my opinion, by the high expectations set at the very beginning.

Not all of the comics are funny, nor are they all meant to be. But some of them struck me as downright sad. Not the ones about depression, which I’ve never struggled with and so won’t try to comment on, but just the ones about being an adult. Yes, motivating yourself to be a productive human being can be hard, but it’s not impossible. And for some reason, those comics struck a nerve with me.

On further reflection, I decided that I didn’t like her take on being an adult because it is everything that the previous generation likes to criticize millenials about. I won’t deny that some of what they say, and some of what Bosh portrays in her comics, doesn’t hit close to home, but millenials are more than capable of being responsible, mature, functioning adults. As someone who often has to struggle at work to make my older coworkers see me as an adult, it infuriates me to see millenials portraying themselves that way.

So maybe that’s just me being overly sensitive, but it sort of ruined the book for me. Also, I love dogs, have owned dogs my entire life and plan to continue doing so, but if all I knew about having pets came from this book, I would never in a million years consider getting one. Her dogs sound terrible. And I realize the title of the book is Hyperbole and that she probably exaggerates things for comedic purposes, but it struck me as too much.

Oddly enough, I think Bosh and I would get along pretty well. From what I can tell, there’s a lot of common ground there. Which makes it all the more surprising that I just didn’t like her book. Maybe you’ll find it more to your taste than mine, but for me it rates two stars.


We Should All Be Feminists

The issue of gender equality is huge and complicated and We Should All Be Feminists is about fifty pages long, so obviously there is a lot more to be said on this topic than what Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie manages to cover here, but it’s a great start. This is an essay adapted from a TED talk, so if you’re really against reading (curious: if you’re really against reading, what brought you to a book review blog?) you could go watch that instead. I haven’t, but I’m betting it’s pretty solid.

Adichie covers topics like why we call it feminism when it’s really about egalitarianism, what gender discrimination looks like in 21st century America, as well as places around the world, primarily Nigeria, which is her native country, and why men should be just as invested in this topic as women. (In other words, why we should all be feminists.)

This is a concise, well-written, excellently argued stance on the importance of feminism. I’m going to start carrying a copy around with me and anytime I find myself struggling to make a point, I’m just going to hand whoever I’m talking to the book and tell them to read it. Adichie does a much better job of explaining feminism than I ever will. It doesn’t get that elusive fifth star, but it rates a very solid four.